Thursday, 3 September 2009

Fruit Thieves Framed



Far too many green moths and butterflies have featured recently on this blog. Time for some green birds. And what could be greener than this fine family of Ring-necked Parakeets that I finally managed to capture – red-handed – in my pear tree. On HD video that is.

That is Mrs Parakeet on the left, junior in the middle and, Pa Parkeet flying in for a fruit feast on the right. They do this every autumn, although it is devilishly difficult to catch them on camera. They are even worse than crows for knowing that you are attempting to film them. Early morning is best.

These pears are at a height of about 30 feet, and fortuitously there is a window more or less level that provides a convenient vantage point. It is astonishingly easy to miss these brightly coloured birds quietly chomping away in the foliage. Same camouflage technique as Golden Orioles I suppose.

Should we welcome these recent invaders? They have become one of the more numerous and vocal birds in the parks around Acton where BirdGuides' London office is based. Presumably they compete with other hole-nesting birds such as Great Spotted Woodpecker and perhaps Stock Dove. I hear on the grape vine that moves are afoot to curb the Parakeet population. Does anyone know of hard evidence that they are doing harm to the natural population? And are there any reliable estimates of their current population?

6 comments:

Stuck in a Rutt said...

Hi Max,
Have a read of http://10000birds.com/ring-necked-parakeets-in-the-uk.htm How does London do for Nuthatches?

JRandSue said...

Great looking Images,love the deep colouring.
Brill.
John.

Thing said...

At last, back to the birds again...

My local park in west london has both RNP and Parakeets. One is considerably noisier than the other...

Andy said...

Coincidentally I've just blogged on alien species.

The Early Birder said...

There is clear evidence where I work (RHS Wisley Garden) that they have taken over Starling nest holes.

Thing said...

Dur, what I meant to say was Nuthatch and RNP.